Menu
RSS

Arctic Circle Conference was held in Iceland Featured

Arctic Circle Conference was held in Iceland

The Arctic Circle is non-profit and nonpartisan; designed to increase participation in Arctic dialogue and strengthen the international focus on the future of the Arctic. The mission of the Arctic Circle, is to facilitate dialogue and build relationships to address rapid changes in the Arctic. 

The Arctic is the fastest-warming place on Earth which has sociological consequences all over the world. It is thus important that these challenges be met in a responsible manner. This was the subject of the first Arctic Circle conference that was held in Reykjavík mid-October; where the dialogue began.

The various issues covered in the conference included Sea ice melt and extreme weather; Security in the Arctic; The interaction of politics & geography in the Arctic; Fisheries and ecosystem management, Polar law: treaties and agreements Arctic tourism; The role and rights of indigenous peoples; and Shipping and transportation infrastructure.

Icelandic lecturers at the conference included, among others, Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, the President of Iceland, Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson Minister for Foreign Affairs, Guðfinna Aðalgeirsdóttir and Ingibjörg Jónsdóttir, Associate Professor at the UoI School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Helgi Björnsson, Research Scientists at the UoI Science Institute.

Furthermore, Icelandic Scientists participated in two breakout sessions organized by the School of Engineering and Natural Sciences and The Centre for Arctic Policy Studies; THE DYNAMIC NORTH: SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY and EMERGING TRENDS IN THE WEST-NORDIC ARCTIC: SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL-HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES.

The total number of participants was around 700 from various sectors; including politicians and CEOs, representatives from environmental organizations, scientists, activists, students, members of the media etc.

For further information please consult the Arctic Circle website.

 

Source: University of Iceland

 

back to top

Business

Politics

Travel

Sports

Entertainment

Culture