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Places to see in Iceland

In Iceland you will find an extraordinary and beautiful nature. Volcanoes, glaciers, hot springs, geysers, lava fields, geothermal areas, northern lights and much more. You can experience a real adventure in Iceland. Be sure to see the best of Iceland when you visit.

 

A few notable places

 

Geysir Geothermal Area - South West Iceland

Geysir, sometimes known as The Great Geysir, is a geyser in southwestern Iceland. It was the first geyser described in a printed source and the first known to modern Europeans. The English word geyser (a spouting hot spring) derives from Geysir. The name Geysir itself is derived from the Icelandic verb geysa, "to gush", the verb from Old Norse. Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser about 50 metres south.
Eruptions at Geysir can hurl boiling water up to 70 metres in the air. However, eruptions may be infrequent, and have in the past stopped altogether for years at a time. There are many geysers and hot springs in the area, which is one of the biggest tourist attractions in Iceland.

 

Gullfoss Waterfall - South West Iceland

Gullfoss (e Golden Falls) is a waterfall located in the canyon of Hvítá river in southwest Iceland.
Gullfoss is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the country. The wide Hvítá rushes southward. About a kilometer above the falls it turns sharply to the right and flows down into a wide curved three-step "staircase" and then abruptly plunges in two stages (11 m and 21 m) into a crevice 32 m (105 ft) deep. The crevice, about 20 m (60 ft) wide, and 2.5 km in length, extends perpendicular to the flow of the river. As one first approaches the falls, the crevice is obscured from view, so that it appears that a mighty river simply vanishes into the earth.

 

Thingvellir National Park - South West Iceland

Þingvellir (Thingvellir) is a place in southwestern Iceland, near the peninsula of Reykjanes and the Hengill volcanic area. Thingvellir is a site of historical, cultural, and geological importance and is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland. It is the site of a rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It is also home to Thingvallavatn, the largest natural lake in Iceland. Parliament or Alþingi (Althingi) was established at Thingvellir in 930 and remained there until 1789. Thingvellir National Park was founded in 1930 to protect the remains of the parliament site and was later expanded to protect natural phenomena in the surrounding area. Thingvellir National Park was the first national park in Iceland and was decreed "a protected national shrine for all Icelanders, the perpetual property of the Icelandic nation under the preservation of parliament, never to be sold or mortgaged."

 

Eyjafjallajokull Glacier - South Iceland

Eyjafjallajökull is one of the smaller ice caps of Iceland, situated to the north of Skógar and to the west of Mýrdalsjökull glacier. The ice cap covers the caldera of a volcano with a summit elevation of 1,666 metres (5,466 ft). The volcano has erupted relatively frequently since the last glacial period, most recently in 2010 when it disrupted air traffic around Europe.
You can take hiking trips there, snowmobiling trips and glacier hikes.

 

Skaftafell National Park - South Iceland

Skaftafell National Park was a national park, situated between Kirkjubæjarklaustur town, typically referred to as Klaustur, and Höfn in the south of Iceland. On 7 June 2008, it became a part of the larger Vatnajökull National Park.
It was founded on September 15, 1967, and enlarged twice afterwards. Today, the park measures about 4807 km2 (2884 mi²), making it Iceland's second largest national park. It is home to the valley Morsárdalur, the mountain Kristínartindar and the glacier Skaftafellsjökull (a spur of the Vatnajökull ice cap).
The landscape is very similar to some of the Alps, but it has been formed in thousands of years by different influences of fire (volcanic eruptions of Öræfajökull) and water (the glaciers Skeiðarájökull and Skaftafellsjökull), the rivers Skeiðará, Morsá und Skaftafellsá. Volcanic eruptions under the ice-cap can give rise to jökulhlaups (glacial floods) which swell the Skeiðará river massively. The sandy wasteland between the glacier and the sea caused by jökulhlaups is called the Sandur. The last jökulhlaup occurred in 1996.
Taking hikes around Skaftafell national park is very popular, the scenery is one of a kind in the world.

 

Jokulsarlon Glacier Lagoon - South East Iceland

Jökulsárlón is a large glacial lagoon in southeast Iceland, on the borders of Vatnajökull National Park. Situated at the head of Breiðamerkurjökull, it evolved into a lagoon after the glacier started receding from the edge of the Atlantic Ocean. The lake has grown since then at varying rates because of melting of the Icelandic glaciers. The lagoon now stands 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) away from the ocean's edge and covers an area of about 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi). It recently became the deepest lake in Iceland at over 248 meters (814 ft) depth as glacial retreat extended its boundaries. The size of the lagoon has increased fourfold since the 1970s. It is considered as one of the natural wonders of Iceland.
The lagoon can be seen along Route 1 between Höfn and Skaftafell. It presents a picturesque parade termed as “A ghostly procession of luminous blue ice-bergs through the 17 km2 (6.6 sq mi) Jokulsarlon Lagoon”.
Jökulsárlón has been a setting for four Hollywood movies -- A View to a Kill, Die Another Day, Tomb Raider and Batman Begins -- in addition to the reality-TV series Amazing Race. A postage stamp depicting Jokulsarlon lagoon was issued in 1991 with a face value of 26 krónur.

 

Snaefellsnes Peninsula - West Iceland

The Snaefellsnes is a peninsula situated to the west of Borgarfjordur town, in western Iceland. It has been named Iceland in Miniature, because many national sights can be found in the area, including the Snaefellsjokull volcano, regarded as one of the symbols of Iceland. With its height of 1446 m, it is the highest mountain on the peninsula and has a glacier at its peak. (Jökull" means "glacier" in Icelandic). The volcano can be seen on clear days from Reykjavik, a distance of about 120 km. The mountain is also known as the setting of the novel Journey to the Center of the Earth by the French author Jules Verne. The area surrounding Snaefellsjokull has been designated one of the four National Parks by the government of Iceland.
The peninsula is one of the main settings in the Laxdaela saga and it was, according to this saga, the birthplace of the first West Norse member of the Varangian Guard, Bolli Bollasson.

 

Myvatn lake - North Iceland

Myvatn is a shallow eutrophic lake situated in an area of active volcanism in the north of Iceland, not far from Krafla volcano. The lake and its surrounding wetlands have an exceptionally rich fauna of waterbirds, especially ducks. The lake was created by a large basaltic lava eruption 2300 years ago, and the surrounding landscape is dominated by volcanic landforms, including lava pillars and rootless vents (pseudocraters). The effluent river Laxa is known for its rich fishing for Brown Trout and Atlantic Salmon. The name of the lake Myvatn (e. Midges Water) comes from the huge numbers of flies (midges) to be found there in the summer.
The name Myvatn is sometimes used not only for the lake but the whole surrounding inhabited area. The River Laxá, Lake Myvatn and the surrounding wetlands are protected as a nature reserve (The Mývatn-Laxá Nature Conservation Area).
Since the year 2000, a marathon around the lake takes place in summer.

 

 

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